Fencing Academy

fencing

“Fencing is the thrilling sound of steel meeting steel. It is the sweet taste of victory and the personal growth accompanying both victory and defeat. When involved in fencing–it will help you acquire the reflexes of a boxer, the legs of a high jumper, and the concentration of a tournament chess player. The sport develops agility, strength, speed, and cunning. Since it is action-packed, it is known as the fastest martial art. But the best thing about fencing is- IT’S FUN!”

History 

The roots of modern fencing originated from Spain. It was later adopted by Spain when it became one of the leading powers of Europe. In conquest, the Spanish forces carried fencing around the world, particularly southern Italy, one of the major areas of strife between both nations.
The mechanics of modern fencing originated in the 18th century in an Italian school of fencing of the Renaissance, and, under their influence, was improved by the French school of fencing.The Spanish school of fencing stagnated and was replaced by the Italian and French schools. Nowadays, these two schools are the most influential around the world.
Dueling went into sharp decline after World War I. After World War II, dueling went out of use in Europe except for very rare exceptions. Training for duels, once fashionable for males of aristocratic backgrounds (although fencing masters such as Hope suggest that many people considered themselves trained from taking only one or two lessons), all but disappeared, along with the classes themselves. Fencing continued as a sport, with tournaments and championships. However, the need to actually prepare for a duel with “sharps” vanished, changing both training and technique.
Starting with épée in 1936, side-judges were replaced by an electrical scoring apparatus, with an audible tone and a red or green light indicating when a touch landed. Foil first embraced electronic scoring in 1956, sabre in 1988. The scoring box reduced the bias in judging, and permitted more accurate scoring of faster actions, lighter touches, and more touches to the back and flank than before.

Weapons

There are the three weapons, foil, sabre and épée. The weapon used also affects the match.
Foil: a light thrusting weapon that targets the torso, neck, and groin, including the back, but not the arms. Touches are scored only with the tip; hits with the side of the blade do not count, and do not halt the action. Touches that land outside of the target area (off-target) stop the action, and are not scored. Only a single hit can be scored by either fencer at one time. If both fencers hit at the same time, the referee uses the rules of “right of way” to determine which fencer gets the point. If both fencers begin their attack at the same time, neither fencer scores a point. The hand guard on the foil is small circle that only serves to protect the hand from direct stabs.
Sabre: a light cutting and thrusting weapon that targets the entire body above the waist, excluding the hands. Hits with the edges of the blade or the point are valid. As in foil, touches that land outside of the target area are not scored. However, unlike foil, these off-target touches do not stop the action, and the fencing continues. In the case of both fencers landing a scoring touch, the referee determines which fencer receives the point for the action, again through the use of “right of way”. The hand guard on the saber extends from pommel to the base of where the blade connects to the hilt. This is generally turned outwards during sport to protect the sword arm.
Épée: a heavier thrusting weapon that targets the entire body. All hits must be with the tip and not the sides of the blade. Touches hit by the side of the blade do not halt the action. Unlike foil and sabre, épée does not use “right of way”, and allows simultaneous hits by both fencers. However, if the score is tied at the last point and a double touch is scored, nobody is awarded the point. The hand guard on the épée is a large circle that extends towards the pommel, effectively covering the hand.

Extra Coaching- The famous saying “ The Battle of water-loo was won on the play –fields of Eton & harrow”  is true even today and will remain so for ever. On the fields players are so trained that they are competent enough to meet all challenges of life, we at Ad Astra aim to do exactly that. Our focus will be to instill sense of team spirit. Train them in goal setting improve their written and verbal communication, organize ground discussions on current topics informally and help them chalk out strategies for effective time management. Sports fields are ideal places for sharpening skills of decision making and enhancing  level of individual and team confidence. In short we will enhance the leadership traits of young boys and girls through online training by the celebrities like Sachin Tendulkar, Krishnamachari Srikkanth, MS Dhoni, Rahul Dravid , Chetan Anand , etc.

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The online portal  wwww.careerstrokes.com will  be facilitate the above training

I may add that the young training and achievement will be recognized  by awarding certificates to the individuals by Kris. Srikkanth

This will add another feather to the caps of those enrolled in Ad Astra Sports Academy.

The areas are-

  • Professional development
  • Team work
  • Goal setting
  • Leadership skills
  • Stress management
  • Communication skills
  • Group discussion
  • Motivation & confidence building
  • Decision making
  • Coaching & mentoring
  • Time management
  • Benchmarking